Search results for "herbivorous"

  • Soil-dwelling herbivorous mite

     

  • Limited grazing pressure by native herbivores on the invasive seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia in a temperate Australian estuary

     

  • Shunosaurus lii

    Shunosaurus lii was a slow-moving herbivorous dinosaur which lived around 170 million years ago and probably had a lifespan of over 120 years.

  • Herbivory: eating plants

    Herbivory is the act of eating plants and a herbivore is an animal that eats plants. Herbivores play an important role in the ecology of any area, influencing plant communities and individual plant growth. The great diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate herbivores reflects the diversity of plants. Each plant provides a wide range of feeding opportunities and herbivores show many adaptations, like modified mouthparts and behaviours that allow them to feed on plants.

  • Diprotodon optatum

    The massive Diprotodon optatum, from the Pleistocene of Australia, was the largest marsupial known and the last of the extinct, herbivorous diprotodontids. Diprotodon was the first fossil mammal named from Australia (Owen 1838) and one of the most well known of the megafauna. It was widespread across Australia when the first indigenous people arrived, co-existing with them for thousands of years before becoming extinct about 25,000 years ago.

  • Diprotodon optatum

     

  • Euryzygoma dunense

     

  • Psittacosaurus sinensis

    Psittacosaurus sinensis was a small, herbivorous dinosaur which lived around 110 million years ago. It is the most primitive known ceratopsian dinosaur. It was named after the Latin word for parrot, Psittacus, as it had a parrot-like beak.

  • Euryzygoma dunense

    Euryzygoma dunense was a large, quadrupedal marsupial herbivore from the Pliocene of Australia. Euryzygoma had unusual, flaring cheekbones that may have been used either for storing food or as a sexual display. It was a browser, feeding on leaves and shrubs in a variety of habitats. Euryzygoma, a diprotodontine, was closely related to the largest known marsupial, the massive Diprotodon.

  • Eat your greens for evolutionary success

    New evidence suggests that a vegetarian diet promotes evolutionary diversity in crustaceans.

  • Omeisaurus tianfuensis

    Omeisaurus tianfuensis was a long-necked herbivorous dinosaur that lived in herds around 175 million years ago.

  • Insect damage to fruit of endangered Lilly Pillies (Syzgium sp.) and an endangered Quassia species

    Having a better understanding of the identity of the insect herbivores paves the way for better management of endangered plant species (plants with restricted distributions due to habitat fragmentation).

  • Insect damage to fruit of endangered Lilly Pillies (Syzgium sp.) and an endangered Quassia species

    Having a better understanding of the identity of the insect herbivores paves the way for better management of endangered plant species (plants with restricted distributions due to habitat fragmentation).

  • Mamenchisaurus youngi

    Mamenchisaurus youngi was a gigantic herbivore that lived around 150 million years ago and had one of the longest necks of all known dinosaurs.

  • Mamenchisaurus jingyanensis

    Mamenchisaurus jingyanensis was a gigantic herbivore that lived around 150 million years ago and had one of the longest necks of all known dinosaurs.