Search results for "dinosaurs"

  • Dinosaurs

    See, hear, touch and even smell the world of dinosaurs.

  • The living dinosaurs

    Be afraid. One day your pet budgie or that marauding cockatoo may recall the more ‘primitive’ instincts of their relatives. Be very, very afraid – these relatives include T. rex and Velociraptor! Birds are actually specialised theropod dinosaurs. ‘Gone the way of the dinosaurs’ no longer means what we think it does.

  • Australian dinosaurs

    Australian dinosaurs are known mostly from fragmentary fossils, although these show that Australia had a unique, diverse high-latitude dinosaurian fauna. New discoveries of relatively complete dinosaurs from Queensland, however, are putting Australia on the global dinosaur map and opening up a ‘new frontier’ for dinosaur research.

  • Dinosaurs - Stages 4-6 - Student Activities

    Self-guided stimulus questions for Stages 4-6 Science, Biology and Earth and Environmental students to explore the Dinosaurs exhibition.

  • Bird-like dinosaurs

    Many of the characteristics of early and modern birds appeared first in theropod dinosaurs. Feathers, wishbones, modified ‘flapping’ forelimbs and hollow bones are found in the coelurosaurs – the theropod group that includes tyrannosaurs and dromaeosaurs.

  • What is a dinosaur?

    Dinosaurs are a group of reptiles with a set of physical features that are different from those of all other reptiles.

  • Dinosaurs getting around

    Imagining dinosaurs in motion is to bring them truly to life. Mere fossils now become lumbering, bulky, fleet-footed, agile, four-legged, two-legged or even bird-like. How is this transformation possible? What techniques do we use to put muscles on bones and movement into skeletons?

  • Dinosaurs - Stages 1-3 - Student Activities

    Suggestions for adults accompanying primary school dinosaur fans exploring the Dinosaurs exhibition at the Australian Museum.

  • Dinosaurs exhibition (S1 - S3)

    Students explore the world of dinosaurs through skeletons, life-size models, skulls, teeth, claws and hundreds of other fossils.

  • Dinosaurs - Stages 4-6

    Students use stimulus questions to explore the world of dinosaurs.

  • Dinosaur lifecycles: from go to woe

    From a twinkle in its parents’ eyes, to birth, growth and death, the fossil record preserves fascinating hints about the life cycle of a dinosaur.

  • Dinosaurs - Stages 4-6 Teacher Notes

    Information for teachers preparing their students for a self-guided exploration of the Dinosaurs exhibition at the Australian Museum.

  • Chinese dinosaurs

    How did modern birds evolve from small feathered dinosaurs about 140 million years ago? In fact, modern birds are so closely related to dinosaurs that many scientists are now saying that dinosaurs are not extinct - they are alive and well and singing in your neighbourhood! Chinese dinosaur fossils tell an amazing story - view some reconstructions of these finds in this photo gallery.

  • Dinosaur senses

    Both plant-eating and meat-eating dinosaurs needed their senses to find food. How do you search for tasty plants to eat while remaining aware of any stalking predators? How do you find your plant-eating prey when they may be camoflaged or in hiding? Which senses would be most helpful to different kinds of dinosaurs?

  • Australian dinosaurs and their fossils

    Australian dinosaurs are known mostly from fragmentary fossils, although these show that Australia had a unique and diverse range of dinosaurs. New discoveries of relatively complete dinosaurs from Queensland are now putting Australia on the global dinosaur map and opening up a ‘new frontier’ for dinosaur research. View illustrations and fossils of some of Australia's dinosaurs, including the most recent discoveries.