Perameles nasuta Click to enlarge image
Long-nosed Bandicoot, Perameles nasuta Image: T&P Gardner/Nature Focus
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    nasuta
    Genus
    Perameles
    Family
    Peramelidae
    Order
    Peramelemorphia
    Subclass
    Marsupialia
    Class
    Mammalia
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    31 cm - 43 cm

Introduction

The Long-nosed Bandicoot is probably best known for the small, round conical holes it leaves behind as it forages at night.

Identification

About the size of a rabbit, the Long-nosed Bandicoot has pointed ears, a short tail, grey-brown fur and, of course, a long nose.

Habitat

Long-nosed Bandicoots live in forests and woodlands, and heath.

Distribution

Long-nosed Bandicoots are found in eastern Australia, from Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. They were once widespread and common in Sydney. Today, their range and distribution in the Sydney region is reduced, and isolated populations remain in bushland areas to the north and south of Sydney. A small colony at North Head, Manly is classified as an 'endangered population'.



Feeding and diet

Long-nosed Bandicoots eat insects and other small invertebrate prey.

Other behaviours and adaptations

The Long-nosed Bandicoot is probably best known for the small, round conical holes it leaves behind as it forages at night. These holes are dug with the front feet and are big enough for the animal's long, sensitive snout to reach in and detect insects and other small invertebrate prey. During the day they sleep in nests made from grasses and other plant material.

Life history cycle

Long-nosed Bandicoots are solitary for most of the year. The gestation period of only 12.5 days is one of the shortest known of any mammal.