Catostylus mosaicus Click to enlarge image
Jelly Blubber, Catostylus mosaicus Image: Dr Isobel Bennett
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    mosaicus
    Genus
    Catostylus
    Family
    Catostylidae
    Order
    Rhizostomeae
    Class
    Scyphozoa
    Phylum
    Cnidaria
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    35 cm

Introduction

The Jelly Blubber is the most commonly encountered jellyfish along the Australian eastern coast and large swarms sometimes appear in estuarine waters.

Identification

In Sydney waters, the Jelly Blubber's large bell is a creamy white or brown colour, but farther north it is usually blue. This is because the jellyfish has developed a symbiotic relationship with algal plant cells that are kept inside its body. These plants vary in colour from region to region. The algae photosynthesise, converting sunlight into energy that can be used by the jellyfish.

Habitat

Jelly Blubbers tend to be found in intertidal estuaries and coastal waters.

Distribution

Jelly Blubbers are found in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

Feeding and diet

The Jelly Blubber has no mouth but there are many tiny openings in its tentacles. The tentacles also have stinging cells that can capture tiny crustaceans and other plankton.