Striped Marsh Frog (Limnodynastes peronii) Click to enlarge image
A large species of frog reaching up to 7.5 cm in body length. It has a brown back with dark brown longitudinal stripes, and sometimes a cream-coloured or reddish stripe along the middle. There is a pale stripe from under the eye to the top of the arm. The belly is white, and the male has a pale yellow throat with brown mottling. The pupil is horizontal and the iris is gold. Fingers and toes are unwebbed, both without discs. The male has distinctly larger forearms than the female. Image: Jodi Rowley
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    peronii
    Genus
    Limnodynastes
    Family
    Myobatrachidae
    Order
    Anura
    Subclass
    Lissamphibia
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    6.5 cm

Introduction

One of the most common frogs of the eastern coast of Australia, the Striped Marsh Frog is found from northern Queensland to Tasmania.

Habitat

The Striped Marsh Frog is predominantly a pond-dweller but nearly any kind of water will do, including fish ponds and polluted ditches. It is an adaptable frog and often encountered in urban environments. It even occasionally shows up in suburban swimming pools and has been recorded breeding in dogs' water dishes.

Distribution

The Striped Marsh Frog is found throughout eastern Australia.



Communication

The male Striped Marsh Frog's call is a loud 'tok' or 'whuck', which sounds very much like a tennis ball being struck. It can be heard all year round, calling while floating in water or from close to the water's edge.

Breeding behaviours

During spawning, the female Striped Marsh Frog makes a floating foam or bubble raft in which the fertilised eggs are suspended. The tadpoles hatch after a few days and drop into the water as the nest-raft disintegrates.