Centroberyx affinis Click to enlarge image
A Nannygai at a depth of 18 m, "The Arch", Jervis Bay, March 2001. Image: E. Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    affinis
    Genus
    Centroberyx
    Family
    Berycidae
    Suborder
    Beryciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 51 cm in length.

Introduction

The Redfish has large eyes and an oblique mouth that extends back to the posterior margin of the eye. The species is endemic to Australia.

Identification

The Redfish has a moderately deep, compressed body and a large head with serrated opercular and preopercular margins . It has large eyes and an oblique mouth that extends back to the posterior margin of the eye.

There is a single dorsal fin and an anal fin positioned on the lower margin of the body, opposite the soft rayed portion of the dorsal fin. The caudal fin is deeply forked.

Redfish are usually silvery-red with pale spots on the scales forming stripes.

Habitat

The Redfish is mostly found in deep coastal and offshore waters. Juveniles sometimes enter estuaries.

Distribution

Redfish only found in south-eastern Australia and New Zealand. In Australia it is known from southern Queensland to northern Tasmania.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

It feeds on zooplankton in the midwaters.

Other behaviours and adaptations

The Redfish is a schooling species.

Economic impacts

There are trawl fisheries for Redfish in New South Wales and eastern Victoria.

References

  1. Edgar, G.J. 1997. Australian Marine Life: the plants and animals of temperate waters. Reed Books. Pp. 544.
  2. Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  3. Kuiter, R.H. in Gomon, M.F., Glover, C.J.M. & R.H. Kuiter (Eds). 1994. The Fishes of Australia's South Coast. State Print, Adelaide. Pp. 992.
  4. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  5. Kuiter, R.H. 2000. Coastal Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Gary Allen. Pp. 437.