Estuary Stingray, Dasyatis fluviorum Click to enlarge image
A Estuary Stingray feeding in the shallows at Hare Bay, Jervis Bay, New South Wales, 23 April 2014. Image: Sally Reader
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • IUCN Conservation Status
    VULNERABLE (VU)
  • Classification
    Species
    fluviorum
    Genus
    Dasyatis
    Family
    Dasyatidae
    Order
    Myliobatiformes
    Class
    Condrichthyes
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The Estuary Stingray grows to a length of around 130 cm.

Introduction

The Estuary Stingray usually inhabits estuarine habitats including seagrass meadows and mangrove swamps. It was thought to a be common along the east-Australian coast but its population has declined as its habitat has become increasingly affected by coastal development.



Identification

The species is yellow or brown in colour, with a long tail and a distinctive row of of spines starting at the base of the tail and reach the middle of the back. The disc is rhomboid-shaped.



Habitat

Estuaries with significant mangrove forests.

Distribution

The species occurs in the the Gulf of Carpentaria and along the east coast of Australia south to Sydney, New South Wales. Records of the species from New Guinea appear to be a mis-identifications.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Conservation status

The Estuary Stingray is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN.

References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 2009. Sharks and Rays of Australia. Edition 2. CSIRO. Pp. 644, Pl. 1-91.