Blue Grenadier, Macruronus novaezelandiae Click to enlarge image
A Blue Grenadier trawled during the NORFANZ expedition at a depth between the surface and 846m in international waters south of Norfolk Island, June 2003 (NMNZ P.39487). Image: R. McPhee
© NORFANZ

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    novaezelandiae
    Genus
    Macruronus
    Family
    Merlucciidae
    Order
    Gadiformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    It grows to about 1.1 m in length and a weight of about 6 kg.

Introduction

The Blue Grenadier is a benthic species in temperate marine waters of Australia and New Zealand. Juveniles are found inshore, while adults are found in continental slope waters.

Identification

The Blue Grenadier is an elongate, compressed fish that tapers to a point. The second dorsal, anal and caudal fins are all joined. It has a large mouth and tiny deciduous scales.

The species is silvery with a purplish or bluish-green tinge above. The fins of live fish are dark blue.


Blue Grenadier, Macruronus novaezelandiae
A Blue Grenadier trawled during the NORFANZ expedition at a depth between the surface and 846 m in international waters south of Norfolk Island, June 2003 (NMNZ P.39487). Image: R. McPhee
© NORFANZ

Habitat

The Blue Grenadier is a benthic species that is found inshore as juveniles and in continental slope waters at depths from 450 m to 800 m as adults.

Distribution

The species occurs in temperate marine waters of Australia and New Zealand. In Australia it is known from off central New South Wales to south-eastern Western Australia.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Economic impacts

The Blue Grenadier is a commercially important species.

References

  1. Gomon, M.F. in Gomon, M.F., Glover, C.J.M. & R.H. Kuiter (Eds). 1994. The Fishes of Australia's South Coast. State Print, Adelaide. Pp. 992.
  2. Yearsley, G.K., Last, P.R. & R.D. Ward. 1999. Australian Seafood Handbook, an identification guide to domestic species. CSIRO Marine Research. Pp. 461.