Banded Rockcod, Epinephelus ergastularius Click to enlarge image
A 60 cm long Banded Rockcod at a depth of 20 m, on a plane wreck near Port Stephens, New South Wales, March 2010. Image: Dave Harasti
© Dave Harasti

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    ergastularius
    Genus
    Epinephelus
    Family
    Serranidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    It grows to a length of 157 cm and about 66 kg

Introduction

The Banded Rockcod only occurs along the eastern Australian coast. The species can be recognised by its colouration.

Identification

Juvenile Banded Rockcod are brown with seven dark bands on the body. The pale spaces between the second and third bars and the fourth and fifth are narrower than those between the fourth and fifth bars and the fifth and sixth. Adults are pinkish grey. They lack the dark bands of younger fish. The white-margined fins are darker than the body.

Habitat

Adults are caught at depths between 108 m and 370 m. Juveniles have been recorded from depths of 15 m to 128 m.

Distribution

The species is endemic to Australia, occurring from northern Queensland to southern New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Economic impacts

The species is commonly caught on hook and line.

References

  1. Heemstra, P.C. & J.E. Randall. 1999. Serranidae. Groupers and sea basses in Carpenter, K.E & V.H. Niem (ed). pp 2442-2547. The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Pacific. Vol. 4.. FAO species identification guide for Fishery purposes. FAO.