Blog

By Author: Dr Robin Torrence

Replicas share the sparkle of archaeological discoveries

Skilfully made obsidian replicas enable scientists and communities to benefit from and enjoy significant archaeological discoveries.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Tina Mansson, Category: AMRI, Date: 10 Nov 2017

Secrets of early Pacific tattooing tools

Specialised tools made of obsidian were used for tattooing c.3000 years ago by early Pacific societies.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: AMRI, Date: 08 Jul 2016

Lost and found: a Rapa Nui stone tool finds its real home

Geochemical analysis of an obsidian tool mistakenly attributed to Rapa Nui challenges current views about societies in the ancient Pacific.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: AMRI, Date: 11 Mar 2016

Archaeological science celebrates 40 years

The toolbox for archaeology now contains a diverse collection of highly sophisticated scientific techniques.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: AMRI, Date: 09 Apr 2015

Natural glass used for chopping tools in ancient Papua New Guinea

Axes made of glass were used to chop wood over 3000 years ago in Papua New Guinea.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: AMRI, Date: 08 Jan 2015

Ancient Trade Ignores Modern Political Boundaries

Obsidian artefacts reveal social relations between Russia and China about 20,000 years ago.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: Science, Date: 12 Aug 2014

Volcanic disasters and the beginning of Lapita style pottery in Papua New Guinea

A major volcanic eruption about 3000 years ago contributed to the earliest pottery production in Papua New Guinea.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: Science, Date: 26 May 2014

Tracking ancient trade on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea

Discovery of an obsidian source on Manus Island reveals ancient trading patterns in Papua New Guinea

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: Science, Date: 29 Apr 2014

Ancient ceremonial stone tool rescued from bulldozer in Papua New Guinea

A beautiful and expertly-flaked stone tool rescued from a house site opens up a world of meaning for a distant, poorly-known period.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: Science, Date: 25 Nov 2013

Sand paintings from Enga

Traditional culture meets modernism in new artworks from the highlands of Papua New Guinea, writes Dr Robin Torrence.

By: Dr Robin Torrence, Category: Science, Date: 24 Mar 2010