Blog

By Author: Dr Richard Major

How the urban bird gets the worm

Despite their proven predilection for carbohydrates, when the weather changes so does the diet of inner-city ibis.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 09 Apr 2018

Wing tags stand the test of time

Despite their reputation as urban hooligans, Cockatoos seldom vandalised their tags, allowing citizen scientists to study 100% of birds.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 27 Oct 2017

Carb-loading Ibis are long-term stayers

We know that Australian White Ibis enjoy a sandwich in the park, but it’s not just because sausages aren’t on offer.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 12 May 2017

Robins showing their true colours

Some Eastern Yellow Robins are brighter than others, but are they just drifting?

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 10 Feb 2017

Hollows as Homes

A unique and exciting project bringing together AMRI research and citizen science.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 03 Nov 2016

Hollows as Homes citizen science project

A collaboration aiming to build a comprehensive picture of the hollow resources available for native wildlife across Sydney

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: Science, Date: 03 Mar 2016

Predator outwitted – nest cages take eggs off the menu

Experiments reveal that endangered White-fronted Chats will accept nest-cages, giving Sydney’s population a last hurrah

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 26 May 2015

Miner stocks continue to rise, closing out small consumers

A large-scale research collaboration has discovered why the native Noisy Miner now dominates bird communities in eastern Australia.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: AMRI, Date: 20 Apr 2015

High-energy drinks support larger parrot populations

Suburban landscapes provide more consistent floral nectar than native bushland and support a greater abundance of large nectar-feeding birds

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: Science, Date: 27 Nov 2014

Food for the birds – pop-up restaurants on the Kurnell Peninsula

A study of the food supply of an endangered bird population in NSW turned up a surprising but short-lived foraging site.

By: Dr Richard Major, Category: Science, Date: 29 Sep 2014