Glass spear head E033466 Click to enlarge image
Glass spear head E033466 This bifacial point, also known as a Kimberley point, is made from blue bottle glass. It was made in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, and purchased from Mrs S. Mitchell in 1930. Image: unknown
© Australian Museum
Glass spear head E033060
This bifacial point, also known as a Kimberley point, is made from blue bottle glass. It comes from the Forrest River region of the Kimberleys, Western Australia, and was acquired by the museum in 1930. Image: Rebecca Fisher
© Australian Museum

Largely produced in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, the Kimberley points were primarily used as hunting implements, prestige items for exchange, and may also have been integrated into secret-sacred ceremonial contexts. Some of the more recent examples were made not only out of fine-grained stone, but also ceramic and glass, as seen in the animation. Unlike their older stone versions, the glass points had the potential to break off in the body of a hunted animal, causing haemorrhaging and, as a result, a faster kill.

European settlement brought glass and ceramic objects to Australia. Applying skills previously developed to fashion stone tools, Indigenous Australians created the beautiful and intricate glass points with sharp edges and symmetrical bodies. 

McCarthy, Frederick, 1976, Australian Aboriginal Stone Implements Including Bone, Shell and Tooth Implements, The Australian Museum Trust