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Every year many scientists visit the Australian Museum Research Institute Ichthyology department for their research. Further information is available on the AMRI Awards & Fellowships pages.


2018

Professor Mike Bennett

Professor Mike Bennett works at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Queensland. He visited on 28 March 2018 to sample tissues from shark jaws and vertebrae.

Mike's research will undertake high-resolution retrospective genomic analyses using DNA extracted from contemporary and archival Tiger Shark, Greynurse Shark, Mako Shark, and White Shark skeletal material held in museum and trophy collections around the world.

Image: Amanda Hay
© Australian Museum

Professor Mike Bennett


Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh 2018

Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh is Assistant Professor at the Department of Fisheries, Chahabar Maritime University, Iran.

He visited for three days during the week of 10 September, 2018.

Javad's area of expertise is the family Mugilidae, the mullets. During his visit he examined numerous specimens from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh


Chris Goatley and Joseph Dibattista

Dr Chris Goatley (left) is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England.

He visited on 7 May to discuss potential areas of collaboration with Joseph Dibattista (right). Mark McGrouther, the fish collection manager, joined the discussion to clarify the Australian Museum's position on accepting fishes collected during potential research programs.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Chris Goatley


Richard Grainger

Richard Grainger is a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney, studying the foraging ecology of white sharks in NSW, in collaboration with the NSW DPI.

As part of this project he is conducting diet assessments using stomach contents analysis.

Richard visited the Australian Museum from 4 - 6 July to examine bones and otoliths in the ichthyology collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Richard Grainger


Dr Hisashi Imamura - 2018

Dr Hisashi Imamura works in the Faculty of Fisheries Sciences at Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Japan. He visited from the 11 to 15 June 2018. During his stay he examined many specimens of flatheads from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Hisashi Imamura


Graham Short  Healy Hamilton

Dr Graham Short, Holiday Johnson, and Dr Healy Hamilton. Graham is a regular visitor to the Australian Museum. He is a Research Associate at the Californian Academy of Sciences and works on Pygmy Seahorses. Healy is Chief Scientist & Vice President of Conservation Science at NatureServe. Graham, Holiday and Healy stopped at the Australian Museum on their way to Lord Howe Island where they were conducting fieldwork.

Image: Amanda Hay
© Australian Museum

Dr Graham Short, Holiday Johnson, and Dr Healy Hamilton.


Dr Tony Miskiewicz

Dr Tony Miskiewicz is an Australian larval fish expert, being co-author of the book, Larvae of Temperate Australian FIshes.

He works as an Environment Project Officer in the Environment and Health Division of Wollongong City Council.

Tony has visited many times over the years to examine specimens in the larval fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Tony Miskiewicz


Dr Fanny de Busserolles

Dr Fanny de Busserolles works at the Queensland Brain Institute at the University of Queensland.

She visited on 15 and 16 January to examine specimens of Discfish (Diretmus) and discuss lanternfish (Myctophidae) identifications with John Paxton. During her visit Fanny donated specimens of deepsea fishes recently collected in the south-eastern Indian Ocean.

Image: Amanda Hay
© Australian Museum

Dr Fanny de Busserolles


Dr Barry Russell 2018

Dr Barry Russell visited the Australian Museum for two days to further his work on the fishes of Francis Castelnau.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Barry Russell


Yato Takuji

Yato Takuji is affiliated with Kochi University. His research focuses on the gurnard fishes (Family Triglidae).

During his visit from 16 - 24 March, he examined many type specimens of triglids and non-types of the genera Lepidotrigla and Pterygotrigla.

Prior to his arrival at the Australian Museum, Yato examined fishes at Museum Victoria for a week.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Yato Takuji


Dr Peter Unmack

Dr Peter Unmack visited on 22 May 2018 to process fishes that he collected. All specimens will be registered and stored in the ichthyology collection. Peter is a Research Fellow that the University of Canberra. He has conducted extensive freshwater fieldwork over the years.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Peter Unmack



2017

Dr Ruzena Gregorova

Dr Ruzena Gregorova (left) with Senior Fellow, John Paxton in the Fish Section office, 23 January 2017. Dr Ruzena Gregorova is head of the Department of Geology and Paleontology at the Moravian Museum, Brno, Czech Republic. During her visit she examined specimens of roughies and lanternfishes. Ruzena also visited the palaeontology and mineralogy collections.

Image: Sally Reader
© Australian Museum

Dr Ruzena Gregorova


Dr Michael Hammer

Dr Michael Hammer is the Curator of Fishes at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.

During his visit, from 8-12 December, he examined recently-collected specimens of Glossogobius as well as many preserved specimens from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Michael Hammer


Harutaka Hata

Harutaka Hata has almost finished the first year of his doctoral research at the Kagoshima University Museum where he is working on herrings (Clupeidae) and anchovies (Engraulidae). He visited for 5 days during the week of 13 March 2017.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Harutaka Hata


Wouter Holleman

Wouter Holleman is a Research Associate at the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (formerly the JLB Smith Institute).

He visited from 18-20 October 2017.

During his visit Wouter examined specimens of Helcogramma and Springeratus from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Wouter Holleman


Eliza Belle Matthews

Eliza Belle Matthews is a 3rd year Marine Science and Management student at Southern Cross University, Lismore, New South Wales.

She is working full-time for 8 weeks on an internship program.

Her duties thus far have included handling incoming and outgoing specimen loans, databasing and labelling.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Eliza Belle Matthews


Dr Hiroyuki Motomura and students

Dr Hiroyuki Motomura (dark blue shirt, standing in photo), and 7 of his students from the Kagoshima University Museum examined many specimens in the fish collection. Hiro has visited on a number of previous occasions. He is an Australian Museum Research Associate and world expert on the scorpionfishes. The students and their taxa of research are as follows:

Ayumi Bandai (back, centre) - Mullidae (goatfishes), Byeol Jeong (red shirt) - Soleidae (soles), Satokuni Tashiro (black shirt, seated) - Tripterygiidae (triple fins), Sirikanya Chungthanawong (back right) - Tetrarogidae (wasp fishes), Tomohiro Yoshida (blue shirt)- Apogonidae (cardinal fishes), Tomoki Inaba (striped shirt) - Synanceiidae, Inimicus (stinger fishes), Yoshino Fukui (back, second from right) - Labridae (wrasses)

Prior to their visit to the Australian Museum they examined fish specimens at the Western Australian Museum. After leaving the Australian Museum 5 students travelled to Brisbane to work at the Queensland Museum and two went to Darwin to work at the Northern Territory Museum.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australia Museum

Dr Hiroyuki Motomura and students


Dr Naohide Nakayama

Dr Naohide Nakayama is the Project-based Assistant Professor at the Kyoto University Museum. He is studying the taxonomy of rattail fishes (family Macrouridae).

During his stay of one week, starting 21 August 2017, he examined specimens of Coelorinchus from Australian waters.

Prior to arriving at the Australian Museum, he spent a week at both the Northern Territory Museum, Darwin and the Australian National Fish Collection, Hobart.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Naohide Nakayama


Rohan Pett

Rohan Pett is an Australian Museum Reseach Associate.

He visited on October 5 and 10 to examine historic specimens collected by Francis Day.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Rohan Pett


Dr Graham Short

Dr Graham Short is a Research Associate at the Californian Academy of Sciences. He visited for 4 days during February 2017, during which time he examined and photographed specimes of seahorse and pipehorse from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Graham Short


Andrew Stewart

Andrew Stewart is the Ichthyology Collection Manager at Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Museum of New Zealand in Wellington.

He had just finished taking part in a research cruise on the Investigator. The ship had berthed in Sydney, so Andrew took the opportunity to visit the Australian Museum and donate a collection of deepsea fish specimens that were collected during the voyage.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Andrew Stewart


Dr. Christine Thacker

Dr Christine Thacker is the curator of fishes at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles.

During her visit on 27 February 2017, she examined specimens of several genera of native Australian freshwater gudgeons, including Hypseleotris, Philypnodon, and Mogurnda.

She photographed specimens for use in morphometric analysis as part of a wide scale evolutionary study of gudgeon phylogeny and evolution.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Christine Thacker


Dr Peter Unmack and Karl Moy

Dr Peter Unmack (left) is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra. Karl Moy (right) is his Masters student.

Over the years, Peter has conducted extensive freshwater fieldwork. During their visit from 28 to 30 August, Peter and Karl sorted and identified many specimens that they collected. The specimens will soon be registered into the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Peter Unmack and Karl Moy



2016

Deborah Bowden with  Odontaspis herbsti holotype

Deborah Bowden visited on 16 November 2016. She is currently doing a PhD at the University of Queensland where her reseach deals with odontaspid sharks. As part of her research, Deb is reviewing the phylogenomics and morphometrics of the sandtiger sharks (Greynurse Shark, Smalltooth Sand Tiger and Bigeye Sand Tiger).

During her visit, Deb took photographs and measurements of the holotype of Odontaspis herbstii (AMS IB.2136); this species is now known as O. ferox. These measurements will be compared to those of Greynurse Sharks in an effort to better understand relationships within the odontaspid family and broader Lamniform order.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Deborah Bowden


Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh

Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh is Assistant Professor at the Department of Fisheries, Chahabar Maritime University, Iran. His main field of research is on the family Mugilidae, the mullets. Javad worked at the museum on a number of research projects from late July to September.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Javad Ghasemzadeh


Dr Michael Hammer

Dr Michael Hammer in the ichthyology lab, 11 February 2016. During his visit, Michael examined specimens of Rainbowfishes from the fish collection.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Michael Hammer


John Pogonoski

John Pogonoski works at the Australian National Fish Collection, CSIRO, Hobart. During his visit John examined specimens of moray and conger eels in the fish collection. He visited from 13 to 17 October, 2017.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

John Pogonoski


Agathe Ribereau-Gayon

Agathe Ribereau-Gayon visited on 16 September 2016. She is currently doing a PhD at University College London (UK) where her research deals with Forensic Anthropology. As part of her research she analyses the scavenging patterns of marine fauna on human victims submerged in marine environments.

So far, she has been able to identify the presence of numerous cookiecutter shark (Isistius spp.) bitemarks on the bodies of victims. This shows that cookiecutter sharks have a significant impact on the degradation of the corpses, something that may have been previously underestimated in Forensic Anthropology and Pathology.

Agathe is now interested in furthering these findings by documenting the dimensions of the mouths of cookiecutter shark specimens in order to look for any statistical match with the dimensions of the bitemarks.

During her visit, Agathe took photographs and collected macroscopic measurements of specimens of Isistius brasiliensis and I. plutodus, as well as species of the so-called ‘dwarf sharks’, including Squaliolus aliae, Squaliolus laticaudus and Euprotomicrus bispinatus.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Agathe Ribereau-Gayon


Dr Clive Roberts

Dr Clive Roberts is the Curator of Fishes at Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Museum of New Zealand in Wellington.

He visited on 22 and 23 September to examine specimens of Hypoplectrodes in the fish collection and to attend the Whitley Awards evening during which he and colleagues Andrew Stewart and Carl Struthers were presented with the prestigious Royal Zoological Society of NSW Whitley Medal for their four volume book, The Fishes of New Zealand

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Clive Roberts


Stuart Sexton

Stuart Sexton visited for three weeks in January 2016. He is working on a PhD through Flinders University, in conjunction with the South Australian Research and Development Institute. His research is investigating the effects of habitat conditions on the growth and survivorship of sardine larvae off the east coast.

Stuart is accessing larval fish specimens held in the Australian Museum Ichthyology Collection that were collected during surveys undertaken up to 30 years ago. Each larva is measured and using length as a proxy for age, the relationship between environmental conditions and larval age can be estimated enabling us to better understand what conditions promote high levels of survivorship.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Stuart Sexton


Andrew Stewart

Andrew Stewart is the Ichthyology Collection Manager at Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Museum of New Zealand in Wellington.

Andrew visited for the week beginning 19 September to examine specimens of Microstoma and Nansenia in the fish collection. During his stay, he and colleagues Dr Clive Roberts and Carl Struthers were presented with the prestigious Royal Zoological Society of NSW Whitley Medal for their four volume book, The Fishes of New Zealand.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Andrew Stewart


Carl Struthers

Carl Struthers works in the Fish Department at Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Museum of New Zealand in Wellington.

He visited for the week beginning 19 September to examine specimens of Ocean Perch, Helicolenus and beardies in the fish collection.

During his stay, he and colleagues Dr Clive Roberts and Andrew Stewart were presented with the prestigious Royal Zoological Society of NSW Whitley Medal for their four volume book, The Fishes of New Zealand.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Carl Struthers


E-Kai (lemon) Tea

E-Kai (lemon) Tea is an under-graduate student at the University of Sydney. He is working with Australian Museum Research Associate Dr Anthony Gill on fish taxonomy at the Macleay Museum. E-kai is currently working on the descriptions of several new species of Cirrhlabrus (wrasse) and Synchiropus (dragonet) as well as evaluating the phylogenetic relationships of the species within these genera.

Image: Anthony Gill
© Australian Museum

E-Kai (lemon) Tea


Dr Peter Unmack and Carson Creagh

Dr Peter Unmack and Carson Creagh in the fish lab, 11 February 2016. Peter is a Research Fellow that the University of Canberra. He has conducted extensive freshwater fieldwork over the years. During this visit he and Carson unpacked many of the fishes he collected. The specimens were transferred from formalin to ethanol and sorted by species. They are now jarred separately and await registration into the ichthyology collection.

Peter visited from 9-11 February; Carson assisted him for two days.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Dr Peter Unmack and Carson Creagh



2015

Ken Graham, Dr. Sharon Hook and Dr. Alan Williams

Australian Museum Research Associate Ken Graham and CSIRO researchers Sharon Hook and Alan Williams teamed up to prepare for an exciting expedition to explore the deep sea environments in the Great Australian Bight.

Scientists on board the RV Investigator will be learning about the geology of submarine canyons, volcanoes, and hydrocarbon seeps, as well as the animals that live there. Specimens will be collected for museum collections, so we can learn about the types of animals that live in the deep sea, and tissue collections will be made so that we can better understand the adaptations that allow animals to survive in these environments.

Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Ken Graham, Dr. Sharon Hook and Dr. Alan Williams