Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    lineolata
    Genus
    Sepioloidea
    Family
    Sepiadariidae
    Order
    Sepiolida
    Subclass
    Coleoidea
    Class
    Cephalopoda
    Phylum
    Mollusca
  • Size Range
    Body to 7cm long

The common name for this species is derived from the distinctive black stripes on a white background that cover their head and body. It is thought this distinctive colouring might possibly advertise a poisonous nature, potentially contained in the slime they produce.

Identification

Sepioloidea lineolata have a distinctive colour pattern of brown to black stripes over white, although can sometimes also present a mottled purple-brown colour pattern. Their eyes often appear yellow. They possess finger-like papillae over the eyes, along with a pair of kidney-shaped fins on mantle.

Habitat

S. lineolata are found in sand and rubble, often around seagrass beds to depths of 20m.

Distribution

Southern Indo-Pacific waters of Australia; Brisbane around to Shark Bay.

Other behaviours and adaptations

Like other bobtail and bottletail squid, S. lineolata spend most of the day buried under the sand with only the eyes protruding. This helps them to both hide from predators and stalk passing prey such as shrimp and fish.

Breeding behaviours

Adults mate head-to-head, with the female storing the sperm in a pouch under her mouth until ready to lay eggs. White spherical eggs are laid in rock crevices or under loose rubble. The young hatch with the full complement of pyjama stripes, appearing as miniature adults and quickly settle into the sand.

References

  • Jereb, P., & C.F.E Roper (eds) (2005) Cephalopods of the World: Chambered Nautiluses and Sepioids, Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Catalogue for Fishery Purposes, Rome, No. 4, Vol. 1
  • Norman, M., (2000) Cephalopods- A World Guide, ConchBooks, Germany (Hackenheim)
  • Norman, M & A. Reid., (2000) A Guide to Squid, Cuttlefish and Octopuses of Australasia, CSIRO Publishing, Victoria (Collingwood)

Further reading

  • Norman, M.D. & Reid, A.L. (1998) Sepiadariidae. In K.E Carpenter & V.H. Niem, eds, The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Pacific. Volume 2: Cephalopods, crustaceans, holothurians and sharks. FAO Species Identification Guide for Fishery Purposes. Rome, FAO. Pp 719-720.
  • Okutani, T. (1995) Cuttlefish and Squids of the World in Colour. Tokyo, Japan, Okumara Printing C. Ltd.