Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    glycinae
    Genus
    Phalaenoides
    Subfamily
    Agaristinae
    Family
    Noctuidae
    Super Family
    Noctuoidea
    Order
    Lepidoptera
    Class
    Insecta
    Subphylum
    Uniramia
    Phylum
    Arthopoda
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    5 cm

Introduction

Looking more like a butterfly than a moth with its bright colours and habit of flying in the day, the Grapevine Moth is a common sight in Sydney gardens.

Identification

Adults of the Grapevine Moth have tufts of orange hair projecting from their abdomen and the base of their legs, contrasting with the black and white markings of their wings and body. The caterpillars have striking black, white, yellow and orange markings.

Habitat

The Grapevine Moth lives in urban areas, forests and woodlands.

Distribution

The Grapevine Moth is found in southern Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.

Feeding and diet

The Grapevine Moth feeds on nectar and live for only two to three weeks.

Economic impacts

Grapevine Moths have become a pest, particularly in vineyards as they have acquired a taste for grapevine plants. The Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) was introduced to Australia in 1862 as a control for several insect pests including the Grapevine Moth. This operation was unsuccessful and the bird is now considered a pest in Sydney.