Western Jumping Blenny, Lepidoblennius marmoratus Click to enlarge image
A Western Jumping Blenny, Lepidoblennius marmoratus, at a depth of 0.4m, Haycock Point, Carrickalinga, Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia, January 2010. Image: David Muirhead
© David Muirhead

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    marmoratus
    Genus
    Lepidoblennius
    Family
    Tripterygiidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    It grows to 13 cm in length.

Introduction

The Western Jumping Blenny is a small fish that lives in very shallow marine waters of South Australia and Western Australia.

Identification

The Western Jumping Blenny has a slightly compressed body and a scaleless head with a steep snout profile. It has three separate dorsal fins, a long-based anal fin and large pectoral fins.

The species is usually grey to greenish above, pale below, and has blotches or banding on the sides. There are dark vertical lines on the head and rows of dark spots on the dorsal, caudal and pectoral fins.



Habitat

Rockpools and intertidal zones.

Distribution

The Western Jumping Blenny is endemic to Australia. It occurs in temperate marine waters, usually on rocky reefs and intertidal areas, from eastern South Australia to south-western Western Australia.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

Algae forms much of the diet.

References

  • Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  • Kuiter, R.H. in Gomon, M.F., Glover, C.J.M. & R.H. Kuiter (Eds). 1994. The Fishes of Australia's South Coast. State Print, Adelaide. Pp. 992.
  • Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  • Kuiter, R.H. 2000. Coastal Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Gary Allen. Pp. 437.