<i>Trachinotus coppieri</i> Click to enlarge image
Swallowtail Dart Image: Amanda Hay
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    coppingeri
    Genus
    Trachinotus
    Family
    Carangidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 60 cm in length.

Introduction

The Swallowtail Dartbody has a slivery body with dark blotches on the sides. It is endemic to Australia, occurring in tropical and warm temperate marine waters.

Identification

The Swallowtail Dart has a deeply forked caudal fin and elongate leading rays in the soft dorsal finand anal fins. The body is slivery with dark blotches on the sides. There are two blotches above the pectoral fins.

Habitat

The Swallowtail Dart is a pelagic species that is found in coastal waters, often off sandy beaches.

Distribution

It is endemic to Australia, occurring in tropical and warm temperate marine waters from northern Queensland to the central coast of New South Wales, plus Lord Howe Island.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  3. Smith-Vaniz, W.F. in Carpenter, K.E. & V.H. Niem. 1999. The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Pacific. Volume 4. Bony fishes part 2 (Mugilidae to Carangidae). FAO. Rome Pp. iii-v, 2069-2790.