Lagocephalus inermis Click to enlarge image
A 26 cm long Smooth Golden Pufferfish caught on hook and line at Manly, southern Queensland, September 2003. Image: C. Power
© C. Power

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    inermis
    Genus
    Lagocephalus
    Family
    Tetraodontidae
    Order
    Tetraodontiformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to at least 30 cm in length but anecdotal reports suggest that it can grow considerably larger.

Introduction

The Smooth Golden Toadfish is rounded in cross-section. It has a smooth body with a patch of low spines from the chin to the anus. The two teeth in both jaws form a powerful beak.

Identification

The species is rounded in cross-section. It has a smooth body with a patch of low spines from the chin to the anus. The two teeth in both jaws form a powerful beak. The body and head are green-brown above, yellow-silver on the sides and white below. The pectoral fin is bright yellow and the anal fin is white. Seven species of Lagocephalus are recorded from Australian waters.


Smooth Golden Pufferfish caught at North Head
A Smooth Golden Toadfish caught at a depth between 10m and 15m, North Head, Sydney Harbour, New South Wales, July 2007. Note the strong beak-like teeth of this species. Image: B. Bailey
© B. Bailey

Distribution

The species occurs in tropical marine waters of the Indo-Pacific. In Australia it is known from coastal waters of north-western Western Australia, around the tropical north of the country, and south to the southern coast of New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 292.
  2. Allen, G.R. & R. Swainston. 1988. The Marine Fishes of Northwestern Australia. A Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 201.
  3. Gloerfelt-Tarp, T. & P.J. Kailola. 1984. Trawled Fishes of southern Indonesia and northwestern Australia. Jakarta: Directorate General of Fisheries (Indonesia), German Agency for Technical Cooperation, Australian Development Assistance Bureau. Pp. 406.
  4. Sainsbury, K.J., Kailola, P.J., & G.G. Leyland. 1985. Continental Shelf Fishes of northern and northwestern Australia. An illustrated Guide. CSIRO Division of Fisheries Research. Pp. 375.