Flasher Sandgoby, Fusigobius signipinnis Click to enlarge image
A Flasher Sandgoby, Fusigobius signipinnis, at a depth of 5m, Lexa's Patch Reefs in the lagoon close to South Island, Lizard Island, 21 November 2012. Image: Johanna Werminghausen
© Johanna Werminghausen

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    signipinnis
    Genus
    Fusigobius
    Family
    Gobiidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to about 6 cm in length.

Introduction

The Flasher Sandgoby is translucent with tiny dark orange-brown spots on the body. The species occurs in tropical marine waters of the Western Pacific.



Identification

The Flasher Sandgoby is translucent with tiny dark orange-brown spots on the body. The first part of the dorsal fin has black tips and a large orange blotch with white spots. The rest of the dorsal fin, the anal fin and the caudal fin are transparent.

Habitat

The Flasher Sandgoby is usually seen on sand adjacent to coral reefs. It hides in the coral when approached. This fish can be found at depths between 5 m and 25 m.

Distribution

It occurs in tropical marine waters of the Western Pacific, from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, south to Australia and east to Tonga. In Australia the Signal Goby is known from the north-western coast of Western Australia and from the northern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Other behaviours and adaptations

The species is often observed raising and lowering its dorsal fin, hence the common name.

References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 415.