<i>Pseudalutarius nasicornis</i> Click to enlarge image
Rhinoceros Leatherjacket, Pseudaluteres nasicornis A Rhinoceros Leatherjacket trawled by the FRV Kapala at a depth between 29 m and 44 m, south of Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, 25 March 1985. The fish is now registered in the Australian Museum Ichthyology Collection (AMS I.25922-009). Image: Ken Graham
© Ken Graham

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    nasicornis
    Genus
    Pseudalutarius
    Family
    Monancanthidae
    Order
    Tetraodontiformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 18 cm in length.

Introduction

The Rhinoceros Leatherjacket is one of the leatherjacket species that has the dorsal spine positioned in front of the eyes. Usually found in deeper waters, it may occasionally be found in shallow seagrass habitats.



Identification

The species is best recognised by the placement of the first dorsal spine, which is well forward of the eyes. The body is cream coloured, with two dark lines on the upper half of the body. The tail has a dark spot ringed in white or cream.

Habitat

Allen (1997) reports that this species mainly inhabits trawl grounds to depths of 75 m.

Distribution

The species is found throughout the West-Pacific. In Australia its 'officially recorded' distribution appears to be restricted to southern Queensland and northern New South Wales although the Australian Museum collection contains specimens well outside this range.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 292.
  2. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.