Pink Anemonefish,<i> Amphiprion perideraion</i> Click to enlarge image
A Pink Anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, at a depth of 10m, Great Detached Reef, far northern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, November 2001. Image: Erik Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    perideraion
    Genus
    Amphiprion
    Family
    Pomacentridae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 10 cm in length.

Introduction

The Pink Anemonefish is pinkish-orange with a white bar down either side of the face, and a white stripe along the back. It has a white caudal fin. It inhabits coral reefs and is usually associated with the anemone Heteractis magnifica. Usually one adult pair and several juveniles are present in each anemone.



Identification

The Pink Anemonefish is pinkish-orange with a white bar down either side of the face, and a white stripe along the back. It has a white caudal fin.

Habitat

The Pink Anemonefish inhabits coral reefs and is usually associated with the anemone Heteractis magnifica. It is sometimes seen associated with three other anemones: Heteractis crispa, Mactodactyls doreenis and Stichodactyla gigantea. Usually one adult pair and several juveniles are present in each anemone.

It is found in depths from 3m to 30m.

Distribution

This fish occurs in tropical marine waters of the Western Central Pacific, from the Philippine Islands, north to Japan, throughout Micronesia, south to Australia and east to the Samoan Islands.

In Australia it is known from north-western coast of Western Australia and from the northern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

Pink Anemonefish feed on benthic algae and zooplankton.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1991. Damselfishes of the World. Mergus. Pp. 271. Allen, G.R. 1975. Damselfishes of the South Seas. TFH Publications. Pp. 237.
  2. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 220.
  3. Myers, R.F. 1999. Micronesian Reef Fishes. Coral Graphics. Pp. 330.
  4. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 251.