Mangrove Jack, Lutjanus argentimaculatus Click to enlarge image
A Mangrove Jack at a depth of 30 m, Wreck of the President Coolidge, Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu, July 2003. Image: Erik Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    argentimaculatus
    Genus
    Lutjanus
    Family
    Lutjanidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    It grows to 1.2 m in length.

Introduction

The Mangrove Jack is greenish brown to reddish. In Australia it is known from the central coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north of the country and south to the central coast of New South Wales.



Identification

The Mangrove Jack is greenish brown to reddish. Juveniles have pale bars on the sides of the body and one or two blue lines on the cheeks. The species has an emarginatecaudal fin and scale rows on the back that are roughly parallel to the lateral line.

Habitat

Juveniles usually live in mangrove estuaries and freshwater streams. Adults live on deeper offshore reefs down to depths of at least 100 m.

Distribution

The Mangrove Jack occurs in tropical and some warm temperate marine waters of the Indo-West and Central Pacific. In Australia it is known from the central coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north of the country and south to the central coast of New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 292.
  2. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  3. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 557.