<i>Ariosoma howensis</i> Click to enlarge image
A Lord Howe Conger washed up on the beach at Lord Howe Island, New South Wales, August 2005. (AMS I.43701-001). Image: G. Kelly
© LHI Marine Park

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    howensis
    Genus
    Ariosoma
    Family
    Congridae
    Order
    Anguilliformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows at least 40 cm in length.

Introduction

Ariosoma howensis is known from Lord Howe Island, New South Wales, Australia. It was originally described as Congermuraena howensis.

Identification

The Lord Howe Conger is a relatively stout eel with its dorsal fin originating above the operculum. It has four dark bands anteriorly. The first band crosses the snout but leaves the nostrils and lips white. The second band crosses the interobital and forms a dark patch below the eye. The third crosses the nape and preopercular region. The fourth crosses the operculae. The dorsal, caudal and anal fins have thin dark margins.

Ariosoma howensis was originally described as Congermuraena howensis in 1916 by Australian Museum Fish Curator, Allan McCulloch and South Australian Museum Director (past Australian Museum Fish Curator) Edgar Waite. The description was based on three syntype specimens, all of which are housed in the Australian Museum fish collection.



Distribution

It is known from Lord Howe Island, New South Wales, Australia.



References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Karmovskaya, E.S. 2004. Benthopelagic bathyal conger eels of families Congridae and Nettastomatidae from the western tropical Pacific, with descriptions of ten new species. Journal of Ichthyology. 44 (Suppl. 1): S1-S32.
  3. McCulloch, A.R. & Waite, E.R. 1916. Additions to the fish-fauna of Lord Howe Island. No. 5. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia. 40: 437-451.