Longfin Bigeye, <i>Cookeolus japonicus</i> Click to enlarge image
A Longfin Bigeye caught at a depth of 130m, off Lord Howe Island, New South Wales. Image: Geoff Kelly
© Geoff Kelly

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    japonicus
    Genus
    Cookeolus
    Family
    Priacanthidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows up to 60 cm in length.

Introduction

The Longfin Bigeye is a bright red fish that has long dorsal, anal and ventral fins. It usually occurs on deep rocky reefs.

Identification

The Longfin Bigeye can be recognised by its long dorsal, anal and ventral fins. The red colour, upturned mouth and rough scales are all characteristics of the bigeyes (family Priacanthidae).

Habitat

The species lives in deep rocky reefs at depths between 60 m and 400 m.

Distribution

The species is found in marine waters throughout the Indo-Pacific. In Australia it is recorded from off Western Australia and off New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 292.
  2. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  3. Paxton, J.R., D.F. Hoese, G.R. Allen & J.E. Hanley. 1989. Zoological Catalogue of Australia Vol.7 Pisces Petromyzontidae to Carangidae. Canberra: Australian Biological Resources Survey. Pp. i-xii, 1-665.
  4. Starnes, W.C. 1988. Revision, phylogeny and biogeographic comments on the circumtropical marine percoid fish family Priacanthidae. Bulletin of Marine Science. 43(2): 117-203.