Eastern Shovelnose Ray, Aptychotrema rostrata Click to enlarge image
An Eastern Shovelnose Ray, Aptychotrema rostrata, at a depth of 5 m, Fairy Bower, Manly, Sydney, New South Wales, 6 January 2014. Image: Nick Dawkins
© Nick Dawkins

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    rostrata
    Genus
    Aptychotrema
    Family
    Rhinobatidae
    Order
    Rhinobatiformes
    Class
    Chondrichthyes
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    This species grows to 1.2 m in length.

The Eastern Shovelnose Ray can be recognised by its wedge-shaped disc, its long triangular snout and its colouration. It is usually sandy-coloured above and may have darker blotches. The lower surface is white with irregular dark flecks. the species grows to 1.2 m in length.


Eastern Shovelnose Ray, Aptychotrema rostrata
Eastern Shovelnose Ray, Aptychotrema rostrata Image: Mark McGrouther
© Australian Museum

Identification

The Eastern Shovelnose Ray can be recognised by its wedge-shaped disc, its long triangular snout and its colouration. It is usually sandy-coloured above and may have darker blotches. The lower surface is white with irregular dark flecks.

Habitat

It is usually seen in estuaries and on sandy substrates off beaches, but also occurs down to depths of 50 m.

Distribution

The Eastern Shovelnose Ray is endemic to Australia, occurring from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information.



Feeding and diet

Its diet includes penaeid prawns, carid shrimps, stomatopods, crabs and other crustacea, as well as fishes and molluscs.

References

  1. Bush, A. 2005. Morphometric and diet study of the Eastern Shovelnose Ray, Aptychotrema rostrata from Newcastle, New South Wales. Unpublished student paper. Macquarie University. Pp. 16.
  2. Kuiter, R.H. 1993. Coastal Fishes of South-Eastern Australia. Crawford House Press. Pp. 437. (as A.bougainvillii)
  3. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  4. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 1994 Sharks and Rays of Australia. CSIRO. Pp. 513.