Eastern Fiddler Ray, Trygonorrhina fasciata Click to enlarge image
An Eastern Fiddler Ray caught at a depth of 30 m, near North Solitary Island, New South Wales, 22 August 2013. Image: Justin McKenzie
© Justin McKenzie

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    fasciata
    Genus
    Trygonorrhina
    Family
    Rhinobatidae
    Order
    Rhinobatiformes
    Class
    Chondrichthyes
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 1.2 m in length.

Introduction

The Eastern Fiddler Ray can be recognised by the triangular pattern behind the eyes. It has a slender tail and two prominent triangular dorsal fins. The species grows to 1.2 m in length.



Identification

The Eastern Fiddler Ray can be recognised by the triangular pattern behind the eyes. It has a slender tail and two prominent triangular dorsal fins.

At least seven species of Fiddler Rays are currently recognised from Australia. The Southern Fiddler Ray, Trygonorrhina dumerillii, occurs in southern Australian waters from Victoria to south-western Western Australia.

Habitat

It lives coastally in shallow sandy bays and rocky reefs down to depths of about 120 m. The species is commonly seen by divers in New South Wales waters.

Distribution

The Eastern Fiddler Ray occurs from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Hutchins, B. & R. Swainston. 1986. Sea Fishes of Southern Australia. Complete Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Swainston Publishing. Pp. 180.
  2. Kuiter, R.H. 1993. Coastal Fishes of South-Eastern Australia. Crawford House Press. Pp. 437.
  3. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 433.
  4. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 1994. Sharks and Rays of Australia. CSIRO. Pp. 513, Pl. 1-84.