Australian Fur Seal eating an Eastern Angelshark Click to enlarge image
An Eastern Angelshark, Squatina albipunctata, being eaten by a male Australian Fur Seal, off Sydney, 14 October 2102. The water depth was about 150 m.The Eastern Angelshark can be distinguished from the Australian Angelshark, Squatina australis, by the white spots on the upper surface. The Australian Angelshark has dark spots on the lower lobe of the caudal fin. Image: Rob Harcourt
© Rob Harcourt

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    albipunctata
    Genus
    Squatina
    Family
    Squatinidae
    Order
    Squatiniformes
    Class
    Chondrichthyes
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia

Introduction

The Eastern Angelshark is covered with fine white spots. It occurs along the east coast of Australia.

Identification

It has a pattern of fine white spots but lacks ocelli and dark spots. There are spines near the eyes but none down the middle of the disk.

Habitat

It has been recorded from depths between 35 m and 415 m.

Distribution

The species occurs along the east coast of Australia.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.

References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.
  2. Last, P.R. & J.D. Stevens. 2009. Sharks and Rays of Australia. Edition 2. CSIRO. Pp. 644, Pl. 1-91.