Doublebar Goatfish Click to enlarge image
A Doublebar Goatfish at a depth of 15m, Rapid Horn, Osprey Reef, Coral Sea, December 2000. Image: Erik Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    crassilabris
    Genus
    Parupeneus
    Family
    Mullidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 35 cm in length.

Introduction

The Doublebar Goatfish has been called Parupeneus bifasciatus rather than P. crassilabris in most books on Australian fishes.

Identification

Three different colour forms exist for the Doublebar Goatfish. These vary according to location.

The Indo-Australian form is pale with a dark blotch around the eye and two dark bars on the body. There is a yellow spot on each scale and sometimes a faint dark bar on the caudal peduncle. The colouration is stronger in juveniles than adults.

The Pacific form ranges from brown to red with two distinct bars.

The Indian Ocean form has two wedge-shaped bars that become progressively narrower on the belly.

Habitat

Adult Doublebar Goatfish are usually seen on inshore coral reefs and in deep lagoons. Juveniles are more commonly found in surge channels near the intertidal zone. Adults and juveniles are often seen resting on coral or rubble. They occur in small groups or singularly. The species can be found at depths between 1 m and 80 m.

Distribution

In Australia the Doublebar Goatfish is known from the north-western coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north, and south to the southern coast New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

It feeds on crustaceans during the day and fishes and crabs at night.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 220. (as P. bifasciatus)
  2. Kuiter, R.H. 1996. Guide to Sea Fishes of Australia. New Holland. Pp. 362. (as P. bifasciatus)
  3. Myers, R.F. 1999. Micronesian Reef Fishes. Coral Graphics. Pp. 222. (as P. bifasciatus)
  4. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 415. (as P. bifasciatus)