I.46857-001 - Gymnosarda unicolor
I.46857-001 - Gymnosarda unicolor Image: Mark McGrouther
Ichthyology AMS

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    unicolor
    Genus
    Gymnosarda
    Family
    Scombridae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    It grows to 1.6 m in length.

The Dogtooth Tuna has two separate dorsal fins, followed by 6-7 finlets. It has a large mouth with conical teeth in both jaws. The lateral line on the rear half of the fish is wavy. The species is brilliant blue to black above and silver below.


Identification

The Dogtooth Tuna has two separate dorsal fins, followed by 6-7 finlets. It has a large mouth with conical teeth in both jaws. The lateral line on the rear half of the fish is wavy.

The species is brilliant blue to black above and silver below.

Habitat

The Dogtooth Tuna is pelagic offshore species that is sometimes seen cruising along coral reef dropoffs.

Distribution

It has a wide distribution through parts of the Indian Ocean to the Central Pacific.

It is found in most Australian tropical marine waters, with the exception of the Gulf of Carpentaria.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information.



Economic impacts

It is an important commercial fish that is caught primarily with pole and line. It is sold canned and frozen.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 292.
  2. Allen, G.R. & R. Swainston. 1988. The Marine Fishes of North-Western Australia. A Field Guide for Anglers and Divers. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 201.
  3. Collette, B.B. 2001. Scombridae in Carpenter, K.E. & V.H. Niem (Eds). FAO Species Identification Guide for Fishery Purposes. The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Pacific. Volume 6. Bony Fishes part 4 (Labridae to Latimeriidae), estuarine crocodiles, sea turtles, sea snakes and marine mammals. FAO, Rome. Pp. iii-v, 3381-4218.
  4. Collette, B.B. & C.E. Nauen. 1983. FAO species catalogue. Vol. 2. Scombrids of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of tunas, mackerels, bonitos and related species known to date. FAO Fish. Synop. No. 125: i-vii + 1-137.
  5. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 557.