Blue-spot Goby, Pseudogobius sp. 9 Click to enlarge image
A Blue-spot Goby in Wallaga Lake, southern New South Wales. Image: Rudie Kuiter
© Rudie Kuiter

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    sp. 9
    Genus
    Pseudogobius
    Family
    Gobiidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 76 mm in length.

Introduction

The Blue-spot Goby of eastern Australia is an undescribed species that has been called Pseudogobius olorum (Sauvage, 1880) in the literature for many years. It is a carnivorous species.

Identification

The Blue-spot Goby of eastern Australia is a new species that has been called Pseudogobius olorum (Sauvage, 1880) in the literature for many years. This species has a rounded snout, eyes positioned high on the head and pelvic fins fused into a cup-shaped disc.It is grey-brown above with scattered darker blotches, and white or cream below. The common name of this species comes from the blue spot on the first dorsal fin.

Habitat

It is often found in muddy areas and seagrass beds in the upper reaches of estuaries. It is also known to penetrate upstream into freshwater and may remain there for extended periods of time.

Distribution

The Blue-spot Goby occurs in south-eastern Australia from southern Queensland to the Victorian-South Australian border, plus Tasmania.

Feeding and diet

The Blue-spot Goby is a carnivorous species.

References

  1. Griffiths, S.P. 1998. Diel variation in fish assemblages associated with Zostera capricorni in three intermittently open coastal lagoons. Honours thesis, Environmental Science, University of Wollongong. Pp. 128.
  2. Hoese, D.F. & H.K. Larson. in Gomon, M.F, C.J.M. Glover & R.H. Kuiter (Eds). 1994. The Fishes of Australia's South Coast. State Print, Adelaide. Pp. 992.
  3. Kuiter, R.H. 1993. Coastal Fishes of South-Eastern Australia. Crawford House Press. Pp. 437.
  4. Last, P.R., E.O.G. Scott & F.H. Talbot. 1983. Fishes of Tasmania. Tasmanian Fisheries Development Authority. Pp. 563.
  5. Merrick, J.R. & G.E. Schmida. 1984. Australian Freshwater Fishes. Biology and Management. John R. Merrick. Pp. 409.