Blue-ringed Angelfish Click to enlarge image
A Blue-ringed Angelfish at a depth of 18m, Redang Island, Malaysia, 15 April 2001. Image: Erik Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    annularis
    Genus
    Pomacanthus
    Family
    Pomacanthidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 45 cm in length.

Introduction

The Blue-ringed Angelfish is a stunning looking fish. Adults can easily be recognised by the pattern of blue lines on the body and the blue ring above the gill cover.

Identification

Adult Blue-ringed Angelfish are yellow with distinct curved blue lines on the body and a blue ring above the gill cover. The tip of the dorsal fin is often elongate and the caudal fin is white with a yellow margin.

Juvenile Blue-ringed Angelfish are blueish-black with narrow white to blue curved bars on the body.



Habitat

Blue-ringed Angelfish inhabit coral reefs. They are commonly seen around caves, wrecks or jetties, and often in murky water. It is found in depths from 1 m to 60 m.

Distribution

It occurs in tropical marine waters of the Indo-West Pacific, from East Africa, north to Japan, south to Indonesia and east to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

It is not currently known from Australian waters, but may be present.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Click on the map for detailed information. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

The Blue-ringed Angelfish feeds on sponges, sea squirts, salps and zooplankton.

Other behaviours and adaptations

The species is usually seen in pairs or as solitary individuals.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 220.
  2. Allen, G.R., Steene, R. & M. Allen. 1998. A Guide to Angelfishes & Butterflyfishes. Odyssey Publishing/Tropical Reef Research. Pp. 250.