Blacktail Snapper, Lutjanus fulvus Click to enlarge image
A Blacktail Snapper at one of the Ribbon Reefs, outer barrier, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland. Image: William White
© William White

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    fulvus
    Genus
    Lutjanus
    Family
    Lutjanidae
    Order
    Perciformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to 40 cm in length.

Introduction

The Blacktail Snapper occurs in tropical marine waters, inhabiting inshore coral reefs and lagoons. It prefers areas with deep holes and rocks. At night it feeds on benthic crustaceans and fishes such as mullets, goatfishes and damselfishes.

Identification

The Blacktail Snapper has a white-yellow body and a black caudal fin. The front of the dorsal fin is yellow and the soft portion is black. The pectoral, pelvic and anal fins are yellow.

Habitat

The Blacktail Snapper inhabits inshore coral reefs and lagoons. It may also enter mangrove areas and the lower reaches of rivers. It prefers areas with deep holes and rocks. It occurs at depths from 1 m to about 75 m.

Distribution

It occurs in tropical marine waters of the Indo-West Pacific, from the Red Sea, north to Japan, south to Australia and east to the Tuamoto Islands. It has been introduced in the Hawaiian Islands.

In Australia it is known from the north-western coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north of the country and south to southern New South Wales.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Feeding and diet

The Blacktail Snapper feeds at night on benthic crustaceans and fishes such as mullets, goatfishes and damselfishes.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. & Talbot, F.H. 1985. Review of the snappers of the genus Lutjanus(Pisces: Lutjanidae) from the Indo-Pacific, with the description of a new species. Indo-Pacific Fishes 11: 1-87.
  2. Allen, G.R. 1997. Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-east Asia. Western Australian Museum. Pp. 220.
  3. Myers, R.F. 1999. Micronesian Reef Fishes. Coral Graphics. Pp. 330.
  4. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 251.