Bigeye Snapper, Lutjanus lutjanus Click to enlarge image
A Bigeye Snapper at a depth of 12m Agincourt Reef, Great Barrier Reef off Port Douglas, Queensland, June 2002. Image: Erik Schlögl
© Erik Schlögl

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    lutjanus
    Genus
    Lutjanus
    Family
    Lutjanidae
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The Bigeye Snapper grows to 30 cm in length.

Introduction

The Bigeye Snapper is a schooling species living around coral reefs and inshore areas in tropical marine waters of the Indo-West Pacific.



Identification

The Bigeye Snapper is a moderately elongate, compressed fish. As its common name implies, it has very large eyes. The diameter of the eye is greater than the distance between the eye and upper jaw.

The species has a brown to yellow stripe from the snout to the upper caudal peduncle. It has diagonal golden lines following the scale rows above the lateral line and horizontal stripes below. The fins are yellow.



Habitat

It occurs on coral reefs and inshore areas to depths of 90 m.

Distribution

It occurs in tropical marine waters of the Indo-West Pacific.

In Australia it is known from off north-western Western Australia, around the tropical north of the country and south to the northern coast of Queensland.

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



Other behaviours and adaptations

The Bigeye Snapper is a schooling species.

References

  1. Allen, G.R. 1985. Snappers of the World. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Lutjanid Species known to Date. FAO Species Catalogue. Vol. 6. FAO. Rome. Pp. 208, Pl. I-XXVII.
  2. Anderson, W.D. & G.R. Allen. 2001. Lutjanidae. in Carpenter, K.E. & V.H. Niem (Eds). FAO Species Identification Guide for Fishery Purposes. The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Pacific. Volume 5. Bony fishes part 3 (Menidae to Pomacentridae). FAO, Rome. Pp. iii-iv, 2791-3379.
  3. Randall, J.E., Allen, G.R. & R.C. Steene. 1997. Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Crawford House Press. Pp. 557.
  4. Sainsbury, K.J., Kailola, P.J., & G.G. Leyland. 1985. Continental Shelf Fishes of northern and northwestern Australia. An illustrated Guide. CSIRO Division of Fisheries Research. Pp. 375.