Banded Pipefish, Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus Click to enlarge image
The Banded Pipefish can be recognised by its pattern of red to blackish bars, by the presence of a distinct caudal (tail) fin, and by its very long snout. This species lives in caves and crevices and grows to a maximum length of 18 cm. The 12 cm long fish in the image was collected at 10 m depth on a coral slope in the Reef Islands, Solomon Islands. Image: Jeff Williams
© Jeff Williams

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    dactyliophorus
    Genus
    Dunckerocampus
    Order
    Syngnathiformes
    Class
    Actinopterygii
    Subphylum
    Vertebrata
    Phylum
    Chordata
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    The species grows to a maximum length of 18 cm.

Introduction

The Banded Pipefish can be recognised by its pattern of red to blackish bars. In Australia, it occurs in marine tropical waters of Australia.

Identification

The Banded Pipefish has red to blackish bars, a distinct caudal fin, and a very long snout.

Habitat

The species lives in caves and crevices.

Distribution

The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. Source: Atlas of Living Australia.



References

  1. Hoese, D.F., Bray, D.J., Paxton, J.R. & G.R. Allen. 2006. Fishes. In Beesley, P.L. & A. Wells. (eds) Zoological Catalogue of Australia. Volume 35. ABRS & CSIRO Publishing: Australia. parts 1-3, pages 1-2178.