Paralamyctes grayi Click to enlarge image
Red Stone Centipede, Paralamyctes grayi Image: Andrew Donnelly
© Australian Museum

Fast Facts

  • Classification
    Species
    grayi
    Genus
    Paralamyctes
    Family
    Henicopidae
    Order
    Lithobiomorpha
    Subclass
    Pleurostigmophora
    Class
    Chilopoda
    Subphylum
    Uniramia
    Phylum
    Arthopoda
    Kingdom
    Animalia
  • Size Range
    2.0 cm - 3.2 cm

Introduction

Stone centipedes belong to the group of centipedes called Lithobiomorpha and all have 15 pairs of legs and a flattened head and body, allowing them to hunt in narrow spaces.

Identification

Unique to female stone centipedes is a large claw and two or more spurs located behind and between the last pair of walking legs. They use these spurs to roll their eggs in soil (for camouflage) before abandoning them.

Habitat

Stone centipedes live in forests and woodlands.

Distribution

Stone centipedes are found along the east coast of Australia, including the Illawarra and the Blue Mountains. The Australian Museum has recently discovered six new species of Paralamyctes in eastern Australia. All of the species in this genus are Gondwanan, meaning they are also found in New Zealand, India, South Africa and southern South America.