Image: Topaz and albite with muscovite, quartz

Topaz and albite with muscovite, quartz

Topaz and albite with muscovite, quartz, Alabaschaka, Russia, from Albert Chapman Collection.
 

Photographer:
Carl Bento
Rights:
© Australian Museum

Notes

Why special?
An exceptional crystal group of superb sky-blue colour, clarity and perfection with an interesting history from a classic locality.

Collected from:
Alabaschaka, Murzinka, Ural Mountains, Russia

Size:
7.5cm X 7cm

Appearance:
2 pale blue topaz crystals with 3 smoky quartz crystals

             Topaz

Formula:
Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2    (hydrous aluminium silicate)

System:
Orthorhombic

Properties:
Colour: pale blue
Lustre: Vitreous
Hardness: 8
Cleavage: Perfect

How it occurs:
Occurs in pegmatites and high-temperature quartz veins, also in cavities in granites and rhyolites.  

Uses:
Jewellery and gem collectors.


                  Quartz

Formula:
SiO2         (silicon oxide)

System:
Trigonal

Properties:
Colour: smokey
Lustre: Vitreous
Hardness: 7
Cleavage: Poor/Indistinct

How it occurs:
Quartz is Earth's most common mineral and is present in a wide range of rocks. It is a significant component of many igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.

Uses:
Jewellery and gem collectors. Significant in industry; manufacture of glass, optic fibres, paints, abrasives and precision instruments.
 

Additional information

Registration Number: D.50715

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