After being on display for two decades at the AM, the Chapman Collection is about to embark on a journey to regional NSW. The Collection is home to hundreds of perfectly formed and beautiful crystals; delightful displays of light, colour and chemical diversity.


Albert Chapman (left) and Ross Pogson inspect an open cut mine in Broken Hill in the 1980s

Albert Chapman (left) and Ross Pogson inspect an open cut mine in Broken Hill in the 1980s

Image: John Fields
© Australian Museum

It’s days before Christmas in 1995 and a delighted Ross Pogson and his helpers are feverishly packing the extensive Chapman Collection into boxes. With the unfortunate closure of the Mining and Geological Museum in the Rocks, the precious specimens were being donated to the Australian Museum to grace its galleries.

Concerned about the Collection’s safety over the holiday period, Ross and a group of dedicated volunteers packed the collection in little over a week and delivered it safe into the arms of the AM. Following such a herculean effort Ross was promoted the following year. Little did he know that two decades later he would be painstakingly packing each specimen once more for an even bigger journey.


Albert Chapman Gallery

The Albert Chapman Gallery as it was before it was dismantled for relocation and/or storage in 2019 to make way for Project Discover refurbishments

Image: Nick Langley
© Australian Museum

Albert Chapman was born in 1912 and trained as a cabinet maker. His true passion, however, was minerals and he spent a life gathering the finest quality specimens from not only Australia but all over the world. He built up a sizeable collection, kept mostly in two hand-crafted wooden cabinets lined with gorgeous green velvet. Chapman and the AM had a long-standing relationship, and he would often purchase high-quality gems and fossils on the AM's behalf. In fact, Chapman purchased on the AMs behalf one of the 200 treasures currently exhibited in the Westpac Long Gallery, a vibrantly coloured log of petrified wood. He also obtained an amethyst covered sparkling geode in the foyer of the mineral gallery.


Jasperised wood from the Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Jasperised wood from the Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Image: Stuart Humphreys
© ©Australian Museum

The extensive Chapman Collection is embarking on a journey to the Australian Fossil and Mineral Museum in Bathurst, which currently houses the Sommerville Collection. The unification of these two collections means that combined, it will be the largest mineral collection in Australia and most probably the most significant collection of valuable and rare minerals in the southern hemisphere. Both Warren Somerville and Albert Chapman shared a love of collecting minerals and were well acquainted in life. The unification of these two collections is particularly apt, symbolising the reunion of two old friends.


Albert Chapman

Albert Chapman

Image: unknown
© Australian Museum

Warren Somerville grew up in the Orange area, and in the footsteps of Chapman was an avid mineral collector himself. Chapman met Sommerville in the 1960s while he was studying mineralogy, and he urged Sommerville to create a mineralogical and fossil museum on his orchard property. The two travelled together overseas and around Australia on the hunt for the perfect specimens, and Somerville credits Chapman with teaching him a great deal on establishing and maintaining a high-quality mineral connection.


Chapman Gallery tour to Bathurst - Ministerial Announcement 25 Feb 2019

Chapman Gallery tour to Bathurst - Ministerial Announcement 25 Feb 2019

Image: Abram Powell
© Australian Museum

For a chance to see the largest mineral collection in Australia, keep an eye out for the exhibition opening in early June in Bathurst. As for Ross, he’s on a deadline to carefully pack each specimen once again, encasing them in nests of tissue paper in bespoke boxes to ensure they arrive in one piece for your viewing.

Emma Flannery (AMRI Science Communication Intern)