Australian Museum Journal Size composition of lysianassid amphipods in cold and warm water habitats

Shortform:
Steele, 1984, Aust. Mus. Mem. 18(10): 113–119
Author(s):
Steele, D. H.
Year published:
1984
Title:
Size composition of lysianassid amphipods in cold and warm water habitats
Serial title:
Australian Museum Memoir
Volume:
18
Issue:
10
Start page:
113
End page:
119
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1967.18.1984.377
Language:
English
Date published:
31 March 1984
Cover date:
31 December 1983
ISSN:
0067-1967
CODEN:
AUNMA5
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
CRUSTACEA: AMPHIPODA
Digitized:
09 September 2009
Reference number:
377
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (115kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (568kb PDF)

Abstract

Since the family Lysianassidae is one of the largest and most diverse in the order Amphipoda it is suitable for the study of adaptations to different zoogeographic regions. The fauna is best known in regions of cold water (polar oceans and deep sea). Here most species are relatively small (6-13 mm) but a small number of large species are also found. In tropical waters such as the Indo-Pacific lysianassids are less well known and less conspicuous. The species are smaller and there is an apparent lack of large species. The problem is therefore not the occurrence of giants in cold water habitats but rather the small size of tropical species. While increased predation or competition could be responsible it is suggested here that the differences are probably due to shorter life spans at the higher temperatures in tropical waters. The species mature at a small size and produce small clutches of small eggs. In cold water survival is greater and the species mature at a larger size and infrequently produce large clutches of large eggs.

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