Australian Museum Journal North Queensland Ethnography. Bulletin No. 15. Decoration, deformation, and clothing

Shortform:
Roth, 1910, Rec. Aust. Mus. 8(1): 20–54
Author(s):
Roth, Walter E.
Year published:
1910
Title:
North Queensland Ethnography. Bulletin No. 15. Decoration, deformation, and clothing
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
8
Issue:
1
Start page:
20
End page:
54
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.8.1910.933
Language:
English
Plates:
plates viii–x
Date published:
15 November 1910
Cover date:
15 November 1910
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
20 April 2009
Reference number:
933

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander users are warned that this material may contain images of deceased persons or images of places that could cause sorrow

EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (149kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (4930kb PDF)

Abstract

[Excerpt from p. 22] ... The men's hair, combed out with a pointed kangaroo bone, was allowed to grow long, and when necessary the throms would be cut off to make hair-twine. Head-lice were considered an advantage; a man would often lie down with his head resting in his wife's lap when she would comb his hair, examine for the vermin, perhaps eat some, make a peculiar smacking noise when squeezing others, or, if it were perfectly clean in this respect, she would infect it from some one else's head. The beard was very seldom allowed to grow long. Each sex would have the entire limbs and body, except the genitalia, rendered free from hair by singeing with a file-stick—parts which they could not reach, their friends would singe for them. The entire surface would then be smeared with charcoal and grease (T. Petrie).

Last Updated: