Australian Museum Journal The arachnidan fauna of Funafuti. V. The arachnidan fauna

Shortform:
Rainbow, 1897, Aust. Mus. Mem. 3(1): 105–126
Author(s):
Rainbow, W. J.
Year published:
1897
Title:
The arachnidan fauna of Funafuti. V. The arachnidan fauna
Serial title:
Australian Museum Memoir
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
Start page:
105
End page:
126
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1967.3.1897.491
Language:
English
Plates:
plates ii–v
Date published:
25 February 1897
Cover date:
25 February 1897
ISSN:
0067-1967
CODEN:
AUNMA5
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
20 February 2009
Available online:
09 March 2009
Reference number:
491
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (58kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (2391kb PDF)

Abstract

[excerpt from p. 106] It will be seen, therefore, that of the twenty-five species obtained, fifteen would appear to be new to science. The most numerously represented family in the collection is that of the Epeiridae (known to the natives by the name of "Marakau"), of which two species proved to be known, and ten appear to be new. Of the former Epeira mangareva, Walck., has a very wide distribution, extending from the Celebes to New Guinea, and from there to the Island of Mangareva, in the Paumotu or Low Archipelago; the other, E. plebeja, L. Koch, was previously recorded Ly L. Koch from Ovalau and Tonga. One of the principal features that strikes a student upon examining a collection of Island (female) Epeiridae, is the close resemblance the different species bear to one another in shape and contour of the epigynum. In the two species enumerated as previously known, and in each of those described below, with three exceptions, namely, E. distincta, Rainb., E. hoggi, Rainb., and E. speciosa, Rainh., the same general uniformity prevails. There are differences, truly, as will be seen on reference to the figures accompanying this paper; thus in one species, the long dark brown, slightly curved chitinous process is closely adpressed, while in another it is poised upon a high tubercle and stands prominently out.