Australian Museum Journal From Misisil Cave to Eliva Hamlet: rediscovering the Pleistocene in interior West New Britain. In A Pacific Odyssey: Archaeology and Anthropology in the Western Pacific. Papers in Honour of Jim Specht

Shortform:
Pavlides, 2004, Rec. Aust. Mus., Suppl. 29: 97–108
Author(s):
Pavlides, Christina
Year published:
2004
Title:
From Misisil Cave to Eliva Hamlet: rediscovering the Pleistocene in interior West New Britain. In A Pacific Odyssey: Archaeology and Anthropology in the Western Pacific. Papers in Honour of Jim Specht
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement
Volume:
29
Start page:
97
End page:
108
DOI:
10.3853/j.0812-7387.29.2004.1406
Language:
English
Date published:
19 May 2004
Cover date:
19 May 2004
ISBN:
ISBN 0-9750476-2-0 (printed), ISBN 0-9750476-3-9 (online)
ISSN:
0812-7387
CODEN:
RAMSEZ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
ARCHAEOLOGY; NEW BRITAIN
Digitized:
19 May 2004
Available online:
19 May 2004
Reference number:
1406
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (11kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (383kb PDF)

Abstract

The potential for archaeological evidence of Pleistocene activity to exist in West New Britain was first realized by Jim Specht. More recent work in Specht's research region of Yombon reveals intriguing archaeological data which demonstrate the organized utilization of rainforest resources as early as 35,500 years ago. The early colonists of the Bismarck Archipelago were versatile hunter-gatherers able to move beyond the coastal island fringes of Melanesia and harness important economic and lithic resources deep within the lowland rainforests.