Australian Museum Journal The insect fauna of Lord Howe Island

Shortform:
Olliff, 1889, Aust. Mus. Mem. 2(4): 75–98
Author(s):
Olliff, A. S.
Year published:
1889
Title:
The insect fauna of Lord Howe Island
Serial title:
Australian Museum Memoir
Volume:
2
Issue:
4
Start page:
75
End page:
98
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1967.2.1889.482
Language:
English
Plates:
plate vi
Date published:
31 December 1889
Cover date:
31 December 1889
ISSN:
0067-1967
CODEN:
AUNMA5
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
INSECTA; LORD HOWE ISLAND
Digitized:
27 March 2009
Available online:
01 April 2009
Reference number:
482
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (121kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (3377kb PDF)

Abstract

With the exception of two Rhynchophora, described by MM.Saunders and Jekel in 1855, and two Longicorns, made known by Messrs. Adam White and J. Thomson, nothing of importance was published concerning the insects of Lord Howe Island until the year 1874–5, when Mr. F. P. Pascoe described a few remarkable forms from material collected by Mr. G. Masters. Beyond these scattered but interesting descriptions nothing has appeared on the insect fauna of the Island, and I, therefore, propose in this paper to submit all the material to which I have been able to obtain access to a careful examination. The greater part of this material is contained in the collection of the Australian Museum, but I have also had at my disposal a few species from other sources. The collections from Lord Howe Island in the former are mainly the result of Mr. Masters' labours, during three days collecting in June, 1869, and of those of Mr. Etheridge's party, which visited the island, at the instance of the Trustees of that Institution, in August, 1887, and of the efforts of Mr. E. H. Saunders, who made considerable collections there in the beginning of the following year. The latter collection is of special interest in that it contains a number of insects from the summit of Mount Lidgbird, a rocky peak, some 2,500 feet high, of which the entomology was previously unknown....

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