Australian Museum Journal Ornithological notes. II. On a curious nesting-site of Anthus australis

Shortform:
North, 1897, Rec. Aust. Mus. 3(1): 15
Author(s):
North, Alfred J.
Year published:
1897
Title:
Ornithological notes. II. On a curious nesting-site of Anthus australis
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
Start page:
15
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.3.1897.1121
Language:
English
Plates:
plate iv
Date published:
07 January 1897
Cover date:
07 January 1897
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
09 October 2008
Reference number:
1121
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (96kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (829kb PDF)

Abstract

[No abstract is given for this work, it begins as follows] The Trustees of the Australian Museum are indebted to Mr. A.M.N. Rose, for a nest of the Australian Pipit or common "Ground Lark," Anthus australis, placed in a very curious position. It is built inside an old rusty preserve tin, measuring four inches and a half in length by three inches and a half in diameter. The entrance to the nest is narrowed to two inches, by a small platform of dried grasses which protrudes out of the mouth of the tin. This nest was found on the 24th of November, 1896, by Mr. A. Payten at Campbelltown in the same paddock as he shot the specimens of Emblema picta, and contained two slightly incubated eggs. The tin, which has the lid still attached, but bent at a right angle, was lying exposed on the ground, without shelter or concealment of any kind, beyond a few short blades of dried grass. The eggs are of the usual type, a greyish-white, ground colour thickly freckled all over with pale brown markings; length (A) 0.8 x 0.67 inch; (B) 0.84 x 0.67 inch. As will be seen on reference to the accompanying plate, it is a curious site for a bird to select which builds an open cup-shaped nest concealed only by an overhanging tuft of grass, or the surrounding herbage.  

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