Australian Museum Journal Ornithological notes. I. On the extension of the range of Calamanthus fuliginosus, and Emblema picta to New South Wales

Shortform:
North, 1897, Rec. Aust. Mus. 3(1): 14–15
Author(s):
North, Alfred J.
Year published:
1897
Title:
Ornithological notes. I. On the extension of the range of Calamanthus fuliginosus, and Emblema picta to New South Wales
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
Start page:
14
End page:
15
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.3.1897.1120
Language:
English
Date published:
07 January 1897
Cover date:
07 January 1897
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
09 October 2008
Reference number:
1120
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (92kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (290kb PDF)

Abstract

[No abstract is given for this work, it begins as follows] During the months of August and September, 1896, the Ornithological Collection of the Australian Museum has become enriched by the receipt of specimens in the flesh of Calamanthus fuliginosus, and Emblema picta. The former species was obtained on Boloco Station, near Buckley's Crossing Place, New South Wales, on the 19th August by Mr. E. Pay ten, who killed it with a stone. It was then taken to Mr. Reuben Rose, the owner of the station, and was by that gentleman presented to the Trustees of the Museum. Buckley's Crossing Place, situated on the Snowy River, is about 296 miles south of Sydney and 34 miles as the crow flies to the nearest point of the imaginary line between Cape Howe and Forest Hill, which separates the south-eastern corner of New South Wales from Eastern Victoria. The natural or artificial boundaries of the Continent of course do not form any barriers to birds, but hitherto C. fuliginosus has been recorded only from the southern parts of Victoria and South Australia; Tasmania being the stronghold of the species. :From typical examples of C. fuliginosus, the bird procured in New South Wales differs in the following respects: the bill is shorter, the throat is buff instead of white, although similarly streaked with black, and the outer webs of the primaries are externally edged with ashy-white. These slight differences may be due to immaturity, or climatic variation, the locality in which it was obtained being over 2,000 feet above the level of the sea.