Australian Museum Journal Review of the upside-down flies (Diptera: Neurochaetidae) of Madagascar and Africa, and evolution of neurochaetid host plant associations

Shortform:
McAlpine, 1993, Rec. Aust. Mus. 45(2): 221–239
Author(s):
McAlpine, David K.
Year published:
1993
Title:
Review of the upside-down flies (Diptera: Neurochaetidae) of Madagascar and Africa, and evolution of neurochaetid host plant associations
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
45
Issue:
2
Start page:
221
End page:
239
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.45.1993.21
Language:
English
Date published:
30 July 1993
Cover date:
30 July 1993
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
INSECTA: DIPTERA; TAXONOMY
Digitized:
05 February 2009
Reference number:
21
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (98kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (2686kb PDF)

Abstract

The subgenera Neurocytta McAlpine and Neurotexis McAlpine are raised to genera. A revised key to genera of recent Neurochaetidae and a key to species of Neurotexis are given. The new species Neurotexis maura, N. despiciens, N. termon, N. kaplanae, N. delphis, N. charis, N. primula, N. vesca, N. freidbergi and N. polyaster, all from Madagascar, are described. Neurocytta prisca (McAlpine) and Neurotexis stuckenbergi (McAlpine) are new combinations (from Neurochaeta). Additional morphological details are given for Neurocytta prisca. Morphology of the neurochaetid antenna is reviewed. Head-downwards cursorial behaviour is recorded for almost all known Afrotropical species. Apparent host plants recorded for 11 of these are Strelitzia and Ravenala (Zingiberales: Strelitziaceae) and Pandanus (Pandanales: Pandanaceae). Host plant records are superimposed on a revised cladogram of neurochaetid species in an attempt to trace out evolutionary changes in fly-plant associations. An early zingiberalean plant possibly provided the plesiotypic host plant association for Neurochaetidae, and there is evidence that such a plant may have been available to the early Tertiary neurochaetid Anthoclusia.