Australian Museum Journal A revision of the genus Ichnopus (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea: Uristidae)

Shortform:
Lowry and Stoddart, 1992, Rec. Aust. Mus. 44(2): 185–245
Author(s):
Lowry, J. K.; Stoddart, H. E.
Year published:
1992
Title:
A revision of the genus Ichnopus (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea: Uristidae)
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
44
Issue:
2
Start page:
185
End page:
245
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.44.1992.32
Language:
English
Date published:
14 August 1992
Cover date:
14 August 1992
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
CRUSTACEA: AMPHIPODA; TAXONOMY
Digitized:
30 May 2008
Available online:
04 March 2009
Reference number:
32
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (101kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (8165kb PDF)

Abstract

The uristid genus Ichnopus is revised and Glycerina included in its synonymy. A key is provided to the world species. Ichnopus pelagicus Schellenberg, I. pseudoserricrus Ledoyer, I. serricrus Walker, I. spinicornis Boeck, I. taurus Costa, (type species), I. tenuicornis (Haswell), I. teretis (Andres) and I. woodmasoni (Giles) are redescribed. The new species I. annasona, I. capricornus, I. caritus, I. comorensis, I. cribensis, I. malpatun, I. parriwi and I. wardi are described. Ichnopus nossibeensis Ledoyer is considered to be a synonym of I. pelagicus. Ichnopus macrobetomma Stebbing is considered to be an unrecognisable species. Two species groups are recognised: the I. spinicornis group, in which the ischium and carpus of gnathopod 1 are long and most species are pelagic, probably micropredators; and the I. taurus group, in which the ischium and carpus of gnathopod 1 are very long and most species are demersal scavengers. Ichnopus is considered to be a tropical to warm temperate Indo-Pacific genus with some remnants in the Mediterranean and the eastern North Atlantic Ocean. The most primitive species in both groups are found in the Mediterranean Sea and the eastern North Atlantic. It appears that the modern genus had its origins in the old Tethyan fauna.