Australian Museum Journal The scopelocheirid genus Aroui (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea) with notes on the association between scopelocheirid amphipods, cassid gastropods and spatangoid echinoids

Shortform:
Lowry and Stoddart, 1989, Rec. Aust. Mus. 41(2): 111–120
Author(s):
Lowry, J. K.; Stoddart, H. E.
Year published:
1989
Title:
The scopelocheirid genus Aroui (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea) with notes on the association between scopelocheirid amphipods, cassid gastropods and spatangoid echinoids
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
41
Issue:
2
Start page:
111
End page:
120
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.41.1989.139
Language:
English
Date published:
22 September 1989
Cover date:
22 September 1989
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
CRUSTACEA: AMPHIPODA; TAXONOMY
Digitized:
20 September 2007
Available online:
27 February 2009
Reference number:
139
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (92kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (1461kb PDF)

Abstract

Formerly Aroui was a monotypic scopelocheirid genus known only from the Mediterranean Sea. The type species, Aroui setosus Chevreux, is redescribed. It is shown that a neotype, recently established for this species, is invalid, and a lectotype is selected from syntype material in the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris. A second species, Aroui hamatopodus, is described, based on widespread collections from the Australian continental shelf and slope. The genus is rediagnosed and distinguished from all other scopelocheirids by two autapomorphic character states. Evidence is presented which suggests that scopelocheirids are very primitive scavengers, and that there is a three-way association between cassid gastropod predators, scopelocheirid amphipod scavengers and their common prey, spatangoid echinoids. An hypothesis is presented which suggests that scopelocheirid scavengers may have evolved by the early Tertiary and that the association involving cassid gastropods and spatangoid echinoids may date from this time.