Australian Museum Journal The evolution of the skull and the cephalic muscles: a comparative study of their development and adult morphology. Part IV. The Theria, and index

Shortform:
Leighton Kesteven, 1945, Aust. Mus. Mem. 8(4): 294–310
Author(s):
Leighton Kesteven, H.
Year published:
1945
Title:
The evolution of the skull and the cephalic muscles: a comparative study of their development and adult morphology. Part IV. The Theria, and index
Serial title:
Australian Museum Memoir
Volume:
8
Issue:
4
Start page:
294
End page:
310
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1967.8.1945.514
Language:
English
Date published:
13 June 1945
Cover date:
13 June 1945
ISSN:
0067-1967
CODEN:
AUNMA5
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Digitized:
11 June 2009
Reference number:
514
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (255kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (4586kb PDF)

Abstract

[No abstract is given, the work begins as follows] The Theria. The Superficial Facialis Musculature. The Stylohyoideus ;Muscle. The Posterior Digastric Muscle, The Mandibular Muscles. The Branchial and Hypobranchial Muscles. In Part I of this work, dealing with the fishes, instead of describing the muscles of each species before proceeding to those of the next, each was described for the whole of each group. The object was to focus attention upon muscle groups and entities, rather than the musculature of the fishes themselves. It appeared to the writer that the muscular systems of the vertebrata had been evolved, by adaptive modification, from some generalized fish type, and quite early it appeared that a deal of this adaptive modification might be observed in the conditions presented by the elasmobranchian cephalic musculature. Therefore, the first portion of this work was devoted to establishing muscle groups and muscle entities, and at the same time, to an inquiry as to whether the varying complexity of the arrangement and modification of these, essentially similar, groups and entities in the process of functional adaptation in conformity with or response to skeletal changes within the fishes shed any light on their origin from a more generalized condition. ... [etc.]