Australian Museum Journal Contributions to the cranial osteology of the fishes. No. VII. The skull of Neoceratodus forsteri: a study in phylogeny

Shortform:
Leighton Kesteven, 1931, Rec. Aust. Mus. 18(4): 236–266
Author(s):
Leighton Kesteven, H.
Year published:
1931
Title:
Contributions to the cranial osteology of the fishes. No. VII. The skull of Neoceratodus forsteri: a study in phylogeny
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
18
Issue:
4
Start page:
236
End page:
266
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.18.1931.726
Language:
English
Date published:
21 June 1931
Cover date:
21 June 1931
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
FISHES
Digitized:
05 February 2009
Available online:
05 March 2009
Reference number:
726
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (89kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (3463kb PDF)

Abstract

Recent work on the development of the Dipnoi, ganoids, and amphibians, and the increase of our knowledge of the constitution of the stegocephalian and cotylosaurian skulls, throw much light on the interpretation and significance of the structure of the adult skull of Neoceratodus. That this was so very soon became apparent to me whilst engaged upon a general survey of the skull of Neoceratodus in connection with a paper on the evolution of the Anamniota and it was then decided to investigate the matter in more detail at a later date.

In the following pages I have recorded the observations made and the conclusions arrived at after comparing the various structures with those of the fishes and primitive tetrapods. This work has been made possible by the kindness of Dr. Thos. L. Bancroft, of Eidsvold, Queensland, who forwarded me three adult heads carefully preserved in alcohol; to him my thanks are tendered.

From one of these heads I have been fortunate in preparing a chondrocranium in a perfect state of preservation, denuded of every last scrap of tissue and of the investing bones, the latter being, of course, available for study as separate disarticulated bones.

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