Australian Museum Journal The identity of Cook’s Kangaroo

Shortform:
Iredale and Troughton, 1937, Rec. Aust. Mus. 20(1): 67–71
Author(s):
Iredale, T.; Troughton, Ellis Le G.
Year published:
1937
Title:
The identity of Cook’s Kangaroo
Serial title:
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume:
20
Issue:
1
Start page:
67
End page:
71
DOI:
10.3853/j.0067-1975.20.1937.567
Language:
English
Date published:
15 May 1937
Cover date:
15 May 1937
ISSN:
0067-1975
CODEN:
RAUMAJ
Publisher:
The Australian Museum
Place published:
Sydney, Australia
Subjects:
MAMMALIA
Digitized:
13 May 2009
Available online:
16 July 2009
Reference number:
567
EndNote package:
EndNote file
Title page:
Title page (125kb PDF)
Complete work:
Complete work (819kb PDF)

Abstract

In a joint paper concerning "Captain Cook's Kangaroo", in the "Australian Zoologist" for 1925, original accounts were quoted to emphasize the fact that, contrary to popular belief, and subsequent writings which maintained the fallacy, Cook's party did not observe the actual animal at Botany Bay. It was also demonstrated conclusively that the Great Grey Kangaroo (Macropus major Shaw, 1800), hitherto generally listed as Macropus giganteus, is not identical with the small species of kangaroo first observed by Cook and his party at Cooktown.

The ineligible generic names of Jaculus and Jerboa were applied to Cook's animal in 1777 in reference to the outward resemblance to the small rodent jerboas of other lands, together with the specific names of giganteus and gigantea, respectively by Erxleben and Zimmermann, because of its gigantic size in com: parison with them. It was indicated, however, by the present authors in the Check-list of Mammals that the name giganteus for Cook's species was also antedated by that of cangaru, applied by Muller in 1776 in the Systema Naturre of Linné, based upon the original written versions of the name used by the aborigines.

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